Help Rebuild Shattered Lives In Pakistan
The women and children of Pakistan are vulnerable to malnutrition, disease, exposure and exploitation. Education and basic family function has been waylaid due to immediate and projected effects caused by widespread flooding in July/August 2010. Jobs in Pakistan The people of Pakistan know all about monsoon rains and seasonal flooding around the Indus River basin. […]
The women and children of Pakistan are vulnerable to malnutrition, disease, exposure and exploitation. Education and basic family function has been waylaid due to immediate and projected effects caused by widespread flooding in July/August 2010.

Jobs in Pakistan

The people of Pakistan know all about monsoon rains and seasonal flooding around the Indus River basin. But in late summer of 2010, monsoons were especially heavy, deeply affecting the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Sindh, Punjab and Balochistan regions of the country. Nearly 8 inches of rain fell on Kyhber and Punjab in a single 24 hour period, with over 11 inches reported in Peshawar. Approximately one-fifth of Pakistan's total land area - an area the size of Florida - was suddenly underwater. Approximately 20 million people were directly affected by the flood, people who lived or worked in the submerged regions. Untold more people have been impacted by the damage inflicted upon basic infrastructure like roadways and electricity production and delivery. Floodwater have destroyed much of the health care infrastructure in the worst-affected areas, leaving inhabitants especially vulnerable to water-borne disease like cholera, malaria, and diarrhea. With the onset of winter, acute respiratory infections are also on the rise. The World Bank estimates total crop losses to be around $1 billion. In comparison with other natural disasters of recent memory, more people have been affected by the floods in Pakistan than the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, the 2005 Kashmir earthquake and the 2010 Haiti earthquake combined. The flood has devastated the lives of many for the foreseeable future. Over 7 million people were either displaced or lost their home, their livelihood and their material possessions. Economic and political pressure is widespread throughout the country, hampering what refuge flood survivors may find in neighboring territories. Officials have estimated the total economic impact to be as much as $43 billion, and yet pleas for improved global response and support have fallen on deaf ears. For the Pakistani flood victims, the world has given less than $17 per victim, while approximately $1,249, $388, and $1,087 was given to each victim of the tsunami, Kashmir earthquake, and Haiti earthquake respectively. Almost half of those affected (9 million) are either women or children, two segments of the population with the least means to rehabilitate their lives. With over 17 million of Pakistan's farmland flooded and over 200,000 head of livestock killed, rehabilitation will take tremendous collaborative effort from humanitarian, health and governmental agencies worldwide. Farmers are facing a massive loss of food production for 2011 and potential long term shortages could further disrupt stabilization efforts within the Pakistan economy. It has been estimated that over 5.3 million jobs have been lost to the flood, jobs that were desperately necessary to stave off extreme poverty rampant in many regions. To date, tens of thousands of people remain cut off from assistance due to damaged roads and bridges where passage is still impossible. The rapidly descending winter weather will further exacerbate turbulent conditions, and homeless refugees will suffer from exposure, malnutrition and respiratory disease brought on by their untenable living environment. Health, nutrition, education and protection remain priorities for organizations such as UNICEF and WHO. However, these groups report tremendous shortfalls in funds necessary to sustain daily life with food, water and shelter. More financial resources are desperately needed. A non-profit organization named Shelter From The Flood seeks to rebuild 800 villages and restore countless lives threatened by uncertainty and resource shortages. Pakistan flood relief is critically needed to rebuild shattered lives of local peoples

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *